Rosemary Cuttings

The Rosemary bush planted in the 4×4 garden box grew wonderful last year.  It also overwintered well.  The box is on the sunny south side of the house so I supposed that helped.

Rosemary bush

Rosemary bush

I read how to propagate Rosemary and thought it was worth a try.   My daughter cut  some branches that looked like they had been growing recently.   Then I stripped the bottom leaves off the stem and dipped it in root growth hormone powder.

Rosemary cutting

       Rosemary cutting

branch

branch

Set them in small pots and put a plastic sandwich bag over it. They are now sitting in a sunny window sill.  There was a few branches left so I stuck them in a small cell trick thingy with no  plastic. We will see how these compare.

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Our other helper

Mac the gardening feline

Mac the gardening feline

Vermicomposting

Well, it has been a few weeks since I welcomed the worms into my home. The red wrigglers were moved upstairs to keep them warmer and  it seems to have been a success.  The amount of veggie scraps that has been converted to worm poop is amazing.  There is no bad odor just an earthy smell.  A small problem developed over the weekend when I opened the bin to show off the process, fruit flies flew out! Yuck!  From rereading the book The Best Place for Garbage  the flies develop when fresh scraps are put in the bin.  The author suggests freezing the scraps before adding them to the bin.  I will definitely do that from now on.  For now I am pleased with the progress. The fishing worms are still in the basement and slower to eat the scraps.

week 2

Before adding new food

Before adding new food

week 3

Worms in the Basement

I have worms in the basement!

Yes, on purpose.  Yes, I might be crazy.

But when I look at the worm bins I see beautiful flowers and delicious vegetables.  I am now vermicomposting. One bin has a few worms bought from the local box store as live fishing bait.  It doesn’t look like enough worms in there to convert the entire bin to wonderful nutrient rich soil additive. I will probably add some more over the next weeks. The other bin has one pound of red wigglers bought from a compost worm supplier, NC Worm Farm. Follow them here,  The Benefits of Vermicompost | NC Worm Farm News  These worms are smaller but plenty of them. They just arrived yesterday and I am curious to see how fast the vegetable scraps added to the bin disappears.  The bins are in the basement for now. The temperature there holds about 50 degrees so I hope that works. I may move them upstairs to a warmer location.  The book that was very helpful to get started was The Best Place for Garbage by Sandra Wiese.

Look for updates as the worm saga continues. Although it is still difficult to tell if worms are happy?!

Here are the photos of the bin getting started.

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